Colourful sari scarves from my photoshoot last week

scarves

Advertisements

Return to Blighty and the ‘coldest winter for 100 years’!

It has been a while since I wrote anything for the blog, been a tad busy ya’ see! The transition from India to England is finally complete, and ran as smoothly as could be expected. Needless to say, the weather has been a shock to the system and my body has gone into hibernation mode. There has also been a lot of DIY to do, which stopped me from opening cases and unpacking my design work for the first couple of weeks.Despite all the commotion I now have a working studio and have started unpacking my delights from India. It has been a great boost to the system to reunite with some of the beautiful textiles I purchased on my travels, each one with its own memory and story. Some of them have been earmarked for different projects while others, like my Lucknow rugs, are happily scattered around the house. I have some beautiful pure silk saris from Kanchipuram which I am planning to make into patchwork quilts at some point. I also have the Kanchi cotton scarves, made by the wonderful women at RIDE, as part of our new venture. I have a huge variety of colours which will be available for sale very soon on my website www.emmamcginn.com – they are wonderfully lightweight and soft making the perfect accessory springtime!Even the exotic smells of India have travelled back with me in the form of hundreds of joss sticks and, most importantly, in the two huge bags of Sambar mix (spice mix) made by the wonderful Britto from RIDE and given to me on my last day in India. I have already made three meals using the magic mix and they have all been delicious! So even if I don’t get back to India this year, I know that I will have to go again at some point to stock up on Brittos super spice! Woo hoo!I have a busy time ahead, in the coming weeks I am planning to spend some time on my website (in between DIY of course!) with an aim to get ecommerce up and running. I will also be doing some product shots of the Kanchi scarves so that I can get them online asap and share them with the world! My indigo project is still going on, but I have to very patiently wait for a parcel from India. It is therefore on the back burner at the moment and part of my ability to be patient is the blatant fact that there is nothing I can do to hurry it along. I also have an article to write for Ethical Fashion Forum on Indigo dyeing, it is well overdue but should be a good one once I get it finished. I am arguing the case for using natural indigo in the denim industry – which seems the obvious choice when you understand the harmful chemicals used to produce synthetic indigo.

So a busy time ahead, and I am finally feeling up to the challenge now that spring is round the corner and life is feeling a bit less hectic.

indian-delights

Sari scarf initiative with RIDE finally takes off!

The sari scarf initiative has finally taken off! After receiving interest from one of RIDE’s supporters to sell our products in their home countries a few months ago, we have since pushed forward with the project and began production.

Since the beginning of the year the Scarf Project team have been trying out different styles, techniques and fabrics looking for the best saris to make into scarves. The idea is to provide employment to some women from the local villages and pay a fair wage for their work (we pay twice the going rate for their sewing skills). Vasantha has been involved with RIDE for over 20 years on various projects. She has had a difficult life with her husband leaving her very soon after marriage. The nature of her culture meant that she did not remarry and therefore has no children. Having lost her own parents she now spends time looking after her nieces and nephews and helping others. In her spare time Vasantha has been teaching ladies in her village how to sew to earn a bit of extra income. She now acts as co-ordinator for the project, distributing work among the ladies and managing the production of the scarves. Britto, director of RIDE, manages the financial side and oversee the project.

At the weekend the team completed their first big batch of 250 scarves. These went off to the US with Olivia (the above mentioned RIDE supporter), who has been staying at RIDE for the past week to collaborate on the project and oversee the production of her order. We appreciated getting feedback on the scarves and are very happy to have Olivia on board. Olivia will now take on the US sales and distribution of the scarves.

I will be taking on the UK sales and distribution of the sari scarves, therefore if you have any enquiries please feel free to contact me.

We have also set up a small shop at RIDE so that we can offer tourists passing through the opportunity to view and buy the products, which includes scarves from this project as well as other items sourced from local producers. Visit RIDE’s website for more information on women’s empowerment and this project.

Preserving Traditional Sari Design

The Weavers Service Centre in Kanchipuram is bursting with master craftsmen employed by the government of India (as part of the Ministry of Textiles) to push their craft to the limits, research traditional techniques and explore new ways to keep the hand loom sector alive in face of modern day competition. It was there I met K.G. Narendrababu (or Babu for short), who took me through the process of designing for hand loom saris. He is an artist at heart and pursues his own work in his spare time, telling me that it is important to have a balance between creating commercialised designs and expressing your own feeing through your art form. I agree with this whole heartedly, but it is good to be reminded sometimes, having decided to work for myself and make textiles my career. There can be a feeling of push and pull, the desire to be creative and explore ones own practice, with the need to commit time to areas of work which will bring in an income.

Babu talked me through some of the changes in sari design. In the traditional design the formula used to create the pattern goes back generations and will differ from region to region. It is inspired by the surrounding landscape of the area, nature and animals. He shared with me the centre’s hand drawn directory of symbols used in Kanchipuram sari design (see images).

Designing takes a modern twist as digital CAD packages are used to produce the patterns to convert it into the many templates used to create the warp and weft threads of the design. Some of the digital designs of sari pallu (the exposed end of the sari) are pictured. The colours maroon, mustard and green are all very auspicious, as is the mango, peacock and lotus flower – all official emblems of India.