Come see me in Dorchester this Women’s Day!

It’s WOMEN’S DAY this Saturday! I will be participating in the WAND event in Dorchester, selling my beautiful Indian sari scarves and spreading the story of the wonderful rural Indian women who make them. It would be great to see you there!

Weighing up our Christmas loot!

Thanks to the generosity of the Sew Scrumptious ‘Dress a Girl’ campaign, along with donations from family and friends, we are proud to say we have a huge amount of clothes to distribute to the children at RIDE‘s 2nd Christmas bash (you can read about RIDE’s 1st Christmas Here)!

The parcel of clothes arrived last week. All the hand made dresses and shorts (made by people in the UK) are just so cute I couldn’t help but start photographing them. I was on my own, looking through the suitcases, and just had to share the excitement! I couldn’t photograph all of them, there’s about 150 dresses and 70 shorts, but they really are all beautiful, even more so because they are made with love.

As with last year, we will be gathering children selected by RIDE organisation, they will include children from RIDE’s Love to Learn project and those who are living at the orphanage. We are looking at up to 150 children, that’s more than last year eeekkkk!

The afternoon will start with some fun and games (I’d like to say organised but not sure it will be), followed by tea and cake. We will distribute the wonderful clothes and take as many pictures as we can so we can share the day with those who made it possible.

The remainder of the clothes will be distributed by RIDE in the coming weeks, during their regular visits to smaller, local charities, and amongst targeted groups and villages.

Power of the Senses

Yesterday RIDE (Rural Institute for Development Education), the NGO I am volunteering with, hosted a program for a group of which included both visually impaired and blind participants from Austria. The day was enriching for all those involved and began with children from RIDE’s school presenting some of their recent work to the group, sing songs, rhymes and recite text in English. I was then given the opportunity to explain the work RIDE does and answer questions from the group, imparting some of the things I had learnt about the weaving communities, child labour, customs and village life.

In the afternoon they were taken to a local village where they were given the opportunity to wander freely, meet locals and get a taste of village life. They also participated in a variety of activities including a visit to the silk worm farm, visit to a silk weavers house, and a visit to some of the more remote temples around Kanchipuram.

The groups own tour guide did a fantastic job relaying the unique visual experience of travelling around India to those who were partially sighted or blind. Describing the landscape around, the dramatic colours, the ever present ‘cow in the road’. The experience gave me a renewed sense of wonder. When we have had visitors stay with us for the first time it is always amazing to see India through their eyes. Spending time with this group made me ‘see’ it differently again, with the senses rather than the eyes. India is a full on attack of the senses; the noise, the smells, the piles of rubbish, the heat, if you can get through this initial onslaught I guarantee you can learn to love it!

India Calls

In just over two weeks my boyfriend (Berg) and I will be moving to India from the UK to spend a year living in Chennai. Berg is working on a migration project based in the city. My time will be split between working for an NGO and researching and writing about ethical fashion.

I have been working for Ethical Fashion Forum for the past few months and will be continuing my work with them while in India writing for the SOURCE Magazine.

I will be visiting sustainable fashion & textiles organisations and meeting contacts I have made through working in ethical fashion and via the Ethical Fashion Network.

I have also connected with an NGO called Rural Institute for Development and Education (RIDE) who I’ll be working with on a long-term basis.

Image: http://www.rideindia.org/activities.htm

RIDE work to support those people living and working in the rural villages of Tamil Nadu in the areas surrounding Chennai.

They carry out fantastic work by supporting children in the villages out of child labour and into education. They provide them with catch up lessons until the children are ready to enter regular schools. They also help the adults to start businesses which have the means to create sustainable income for their families. This is supported by their Entrepreneurial Development Programme which offers practical training in various different fields.

Many of the villages that RIDE work with are known for their exquisite hand-loom woven silk used for the most luxurious saris. This is an area I am very keen to learn more about and develop my understanding of this traditional craft. I’m also interested in the possibility of creating a knowledge transfer programme for those who would like to develop their skills in the fashion & textiles industry.