Chennai Crafts Bazaar

Picture of some of the wonderful crafts on show at The Crafts Council of India Crafts Bazaar 2012, held at Valluvar Kottam exhibition centre in Chennai as part of the Kaiwalam World Crafts Summit. With over a 150 artisans from across India, the Crafts Bazaar showed off India’s rich heritage of arts and crafts.

I couldn’t help but make a few small purchases, which included some cow bells made into a wind chime with amazing acoustics, a beautiful colourful geometric printed blanket and a few too many wooden printing blocks (they can go in my print room when I get back to UK!). I was tempted to buy a giant Khurja t-pots, but really couldn’t find a way to justify this purchase (or transport it safely)!

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Kishkinda Trust women’s empowerment project in Hampi

My partner and I visited Hampi last month and stayed in one of their homestay rooms, living within the village of Anegundi and eating home cooked meals at a local family’s home. The trust has done tremendous work in supporting the local people to realise their true potential, capitalising on the tourist trade passing through Hampi while also staying true to their own roots and cultures. Anegundi is clean, well presented, friendly and happy. While there we saw very few other tourists, and were waved at by almost every child we passed.

I visited the production centre for the Kishkinda Trust craft shop, where they have developed banana fibre production and now produce all kinds of products from bags to sandals. The banana plant is so abundant in India, and at the end of a plants life it is cut right back to make way for new shoots from the root, therefore discarded trunks are in abundance. The Kishkinda Trust manage their own banana plantation providing them with endless potential for products. I don’t think there is one part of the banana plant you can’t use. You can eat the bananas (the obvious one!), the inner stem and the flowers, the leaves are used as plates and to wrap food, and now the fibres from the outer stem are used for a multitude of products!

The production centre supports women from the local Self Help Groups and forms part of a wider female empowerment program. The women are encouraged to develop products themselves and look to really enjoy their work, sitting in groups working away while chatting to one another.

‘At The Kishkinda Trust (TKT) in Anegundi, Conservation empowers communities and creates a way of life that considers culture as an intangible element permeating all activities in life- ranging from functional to ideational-  ecology, cuisine, crafts, design, agriculture, technology, education, markets and festivals.’ The Kishkinda Trust